Tag Archives: Ray Price

My iPod Has Issues – Sad Songs Say Everything

10 Feb

A sadness has come over me. There are reasons for the melancholy that has settled in, but I will not go into them. When I get into a mood such as this, I need to hear sad songs. I suppose many people would listen to happy music in an attempt to pull themselves out. However, sad music helps me focus on what is going through my mind and alleviate some of the feelings that have developed.Pier

With that in mind, I think it is a good time to look into the iPod and play some songs that I consider sad. Of course, that definition is in the ear of the beholder. One person’s sad song could be someone else’s happy song. Nevertheless, here we go.

“Kentucky Rain” by Elvis Presley

“You’ll Never Leave Harlan Alive” by Dave Alvin

“It Was A Very Good Year” by Frank Sinatra

“Love On The Rocks” by Neil Diamond

“The Pretender” by Jackson Browne

“Moment Of Surrender” by U2

“Pieces Of April” by Three Dog Night

“Just A Song Before I Go” by Crosby, Stills and Nash

“Scarborough Fair” by Simon and Garfunkel

“Girl From The North Country” by Bob Dylan and Johnny Cash

“November Rain” by Guns ‘N Roses

“Shenandoah” by The Mormon Tabernacle Choir

“For The Good Times” by Ray Price

“He Ain’t Heavy, He’s My Brother” by The Hollies

“Alone Again” by Dokken

“By The Time I Get To Phoenix” by Glen Campbell

“It Was Almost Like A Song” by Johnny Hartman

“Levon” by Elton John

“Everything Must Change” by Oleta Adams

“Badge” by Cream

Dang, I want to continue listening to sad songs. However, I will stop typing right here.

My iPod Has Issues – Heading to Hilton Head

16 Oct

It has been a busy week, and I have not been able to spend as much time blogging as I would like. The posts have been few and far between. That trend is going to continue because we are heading to Hilton Head, South Carolina over the weekend. Certainly, there will be some good stuff to write about when we return.Hilton Head

In the meantime, here are some selections from the old iPod.

“Ole Slewfoot” by BR-549

“I Won’t Mention It Again” by Ray Price

“Hello Darlin'” by Conway Twitty

“Good Times” by Chic

“In the Still of the Night” by The Five Satins

“Sweet Sixteen” by Big Joe Turner

“Miss You” by The Rolling Stones

“Baby Get Lost” by B.B. King

“You Left a Long, Long Time Ago” by Willie Nelson

“Heartbeat” by Red 7

“Children Go Where I Send Thee” by The Fairfield Four

“Steamroller Blues” by Elvis Presley

“Jezzebella” by Vintage Trouble

“I Ain’t the One” by Waylon Jennings and Jessi Colter

“Baby Let’s Play House” by Arthur Gunter

“Tears in Heaven” by Eric Clapton

“Too Close” by Clair Marlo

“Sirius” by The Alan Parsons Project

“Fat Albert Theme” by Dig

“Enter Sandman” by Metallica

As a famous general once said, “I shall return.”

I Learned My Motto From My Dad in Clarksdale, Mississippi

16 Mar

During our foray into Clarksdale, Mississippi, my mom questioned where or not we should eat at the Ground Zero Blues Club. It looked a little rough around the edges, and she was not sure about it. I must admit that it looked different from what I thought it would.Clarksdale 4

However, my dad did not have such qualms. He wanted to go. Not because he thought the food would be awesome. Not because he thought we might see Morgan Freeman. As he said, it was because we could always say that we did it.

My dad has never said that he has a life’s motto, but I think that would be it. He has spent his life wanting to do as much as possible and wanting to see as much as possible. I have been lucky because he has had the means to do so and because he took me along. He also passed that motto down to me.

I can always say that I did it.

I waited a long time to get married and have a family. While my friends and acquaintances did the usual thing of settling down and making memories, I filled my life with experiences. Those experiences have included traveling to various places; listening to different kinds of music; immersing myself in art; and learning as much about the world as I possibly could.

I have differing tastes, and I am pretty sure a lot of people think I am strange because of it. There have been several posts written about the music of my iPod. Sometimes, I even think it is crazy with the variety of stuff that is on there. Some of it is well-known, and some of it is obscure. I do not even like all of it. It is there because I think it is interesting.

I feel the same thing about the world. It is a very interesting place filled with interesting people and interesting things. Something can be learned from all of it. Driving to Clarksdale, my dad and I were just as interested in the crop dusting planes and the fields they were spraying as we were the destination ahead. It is flat land and seemingly endless, but there is a lot interesting about it. The history. The people. The cemeteries we passed.

It was a new road for me, and I was glad that I drove it because I can always say that I did it.

That is why I saw Dave Brubeck perform. I wanted to always say that I saw him play “Take Five“.

That is why I drank wine at the Inglenook Vineyards. I wanted to always say that I was there.Honeymoon 016

That is why I saw Ray Price in concert. I wanted to always say that I heard him sing “For the Good Times“.

That is why I went to Clarksdale, Mississippi. I wanted to always say that I was there.

That is why I saw Luciano Pavarotti and AC/DC in the same venue during the same week. I wanted to always say that I saw both shows.

That is why I went into the Corn Palace in Mitchell, South Dakota. I wanted to always say that I walked in.

Throughout most of my life people have considered my tastes a little strange. I like music that you cannot find on the radio. I like to travel to places that many people would not even consider. The same can be said for my choice in books, movies and other forms of entertainment. I like those things for the experiences because life should be filled with experiences.

I am not trying to make myself out to be some kind of great thinker who has figured out the secret meaning of life. I am trying to say that I learned something in Clarksdale that had nothing to do with its history.

I never realized what my motto was until my dad spoke it out loud. He stated it perfectly.

I can always say that I did it.

Aimless Wanderings of the Mind

9 Jul

Yesterday, some friends invited me to spend the night on a houseboat. Figuring that there would be a lot of late night commotion on the boat, I took my iPod in case I needed some solitude for sleep. As it turned out, everyone conked out fast from a day filled with activity, but I plugged the iPod into my ears anyway. The Guns n’ Roses version of “Knockin’ on Heaven’s Door” came on and the following took place in my mind.

I immediately thought of the original Bob Dylan version as it played over the death scene of Slim Pickens in Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid, one of my favorite westerns.

From there, I thought about one of the times I saw Bob Dylan in concert. He and Willie Nelson had a tour where they played in minor league baseball stadiums. As I watched them from the infield, I kept wondering what the backstage party must have been like.

Then, I started thinking about a local legend involving Willie Nelson. Tootsie’s Orchid Lounge is a famous honky-tonk in Nashville where singers and players would congregate between sets of the Grand Ole Opry.

It seems that one night Willie was in Tootsie’s drowning his sorrows at the bar. He wasn’t making it in Nashville, and, in a moment of depression, he walked outside and sprawled in the middle of Broadway. His intent was to be run over by a car. Fortunately, they got him out of the street; he went to Texas; grew out his hair; and became a legend.

When this entered my mind, I started thinking about the time I saw Willie with Ray Price and Merle Haggard. Price’s biggest hit was “For the Good Times“, which happened to be written by Kris Kristofferson, the one who played Billy the Kid in Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid.

The other person on the bill, Merle Haggard, is one of my all-time favorites. He performed a song in a movie I recently watched, and I started thinking about a song that appeared in a John Wayne movie called Chisum, an inaccurate retelling of the story of Billy the Kid.

As you can see, Billy the Kid and a bunch of connections to his pop cultural self kept entering my mind. That’s when I started thinking about the last time I visited his grave.At least, that’s his headstone. Some people claim that Billy the Kid got away and lived to be an old man. That’s doubtful. Without a doubt, a flood swept through the cemetery and washed away all of the markers. It may have even carried off a few bodies. So, Billy is probably not anywhere near this piece of rock. However, I started thinking, “What if they had buried him above ground like they do in New Orleans?”

Obviously, this started me down another tread of thought. Earlier this year, we took some students on a field trip to the French Quarter (I know. Cool teacher.), and we toured the City of the Dead, one of their above ground cemeteries. One of the most interesting graves was that of Marie Laveau, voodoo queen of New Orleans.

The grave has offerings left behind by people searching for a blessing. I thought about that, but I also thought about a song by Redbone called “The Witch Queen of New Orleans“.

New Orleans. It’s a cool city, and a lot of movies have been made there. They started running through my mind, but one that I saw the other day stuck out. It was Live and Let Die, the James Bond film that has the scene with an agent watching a funeral parade in the French Quarter. When he asks whose funeral it, he is stabbed and placed in the coffin. That’s when the parade really cranks up. Then, the theme song by Paul McCartney and Wings entered my brain.

That’s when it hit me. Holy crap. “Live and Let Die” was another movie song that was covered by Guns n’ Roses.

By this time, my mind was mush, and I mercifully faded out.