Tag Archives: The Staple Singers

My iPod Has Issues – The Problems With Furniture, DVD’s, Paper, Pencils and Maps

9 Sep

Things that happened today:

I walked into class to see that someone moved all of the furniture around. That is one of the issues with sharing rooms with teachers and others who feel the need to invade. Someone is always moving the furniture around. They could at least put it back where they found it. Oh yeah, that reminds me. They could also erase the whiteboard that they have written all over.

I got a DVD from the library only to discover that the DVD player in the room does not do what you want it to do. The remote control is missing, and the buttons on the actual player will skip through the menu.

I went to a program by a guest lecturer that we invited to campus. I offered my students a chance for extra credit, and a few of them took advantage. My rule was that they had to bring a notecard with their name on it. How many do you think showed up without a notecard or a writing instrument?Pencil

I studied the map for a friend who is going on a trip into the American West. Luckily, I know a lot of the sites by heart because the print on the map is too small to read. I reckon that means I am getting old.

In honor of the furniture; the DVD player; the sudden disappearance of paper and pencils; and the unreadable map, I have decided to relax to the soothing sounds of my iPod.

“Beautiful In My Eyes” by Joshua Kadison

“Minnie the Moocher” by Cab Calloway

“Look What You’ve Done To Me” by Boz Scaggs

“Red Shoe Tango” by George Clinton

“Bat Out of Hell” by Meat Loaf

“C.L.U.” by Daft Punk

“Soldier of Love” by Arthur Alexander

“Come and Get Your Love” by Redbone

“Walking in the Rain” by The Ronettes

“Gnik Nus” by The Beatles

“My Generation” by The Who

“Visions of Johanna” by Bob Dylan

“Chica Boo” by Lloyd Glenn

“Stand!” by Sly and the Family Stone

“The End” by The Doors

“Going Up the Country” by Canned Heat

“Wichita Lineman” by Glen Campbell

“Respect Yourself” by The Staple Singers

“Wild Horses” by The Rolling Stones

“Leader of the Pack” by The Shangri-Las

Now that I am relaxed, it is time to mentally prepare for the coming day.

My iPod Has Issues – Have I Really Written That Much?

6 Feb

I just realized that my last post was Number 400. I cannot believe that I have written that many words on this blog. Some of the posts seem like they were written yesterday. There are other ones that have faded from my memory. All I know is that 400 posts never entered my mind when all of this started.400

To commemorate this milestone, I am going to let my mind and my fingers rest and put together the most simple post that I know how to do. Exploring the dark passages in the mind of my iPod may look difficult and dangerous, but it really is not that hard to accomplish. Despite its reputation of taking people into musical realms that they think is nuts, my iPod does not mean harm. In fact, it is quite pleasant if you can accept it for what it is – a bipolar yet well-rounded individual.

With that being said, let us shuffle up and play.

“Thirsty Man” by Blitzen Trapper

“The Ball Game” by Sister Wynona Carr

“The Day Begins” by The Moody Blues

“It Happened in Monterey” by Frank Sinatra

“Jumpin’ Jack Flash” by The Rolling Stones

“Hello Again” by Neil Diamond

“With Pen In Hand” by Dorothy Moore

“Adagio for TRON” by Daft Punk

“Cry Me A River” by Diana Krall

“I Can’t Make You Love Me” by Bonnie Raitt

“Rollin'” by Big and Rich

“I See You Baby” by Groove Armada

“Respect Yourself” by The Staple Singers

“Crazy In Love” by Beyonce

“God Is Rhythm” by White Boy, Big Mouth and the Assassin with Mia Dunn

“She’s Got You” by Loretta Lynn

“How Blue Can You Get?” by B.B. King

“I Feel Love” by Donna Summer

“Polk Salad Annie” by Tony Joe White

“Twentieth Century Fox” by The Doors

This is post Number 401, and there is a lot more to go.

Love, Peace and Soul

2 Feb

This morning the internet was covered with reports of the death of Don Cornelius, creator/host/conductor of “Soul Train”. Because this is the first day of Black History Month, I decided to begin my history classes with the news and a short talk on his influence on music and culture. Some of the students had heard of “Soul Train”, but they really didn’t know anything about it. I hope they do now.

During my younger years, I watched “Soul Train” every chance I could, and I am sure that I was not the only white kid to do that. I think the first attraction was the opening. The animated train chugged across the screen in bright colors while the high-pitched Sooouuulll Traaaiiinn came out of the speakers.

However, once the show started the real action hit the screen. Don Cornelius introduced the performers with a rich, deep voice. Dancers wore funky clothes and made funky moves on the dance floor and down the “Soul Train Line”. I was mesmerized by the people, the music, and the action. Being a red-blooded American male, I paid special attention to the female dancers. I never tried any of the moves because I didn’t want to bust my butt, but I wished I could wear the clothes and be absorbed by the music. I didn’t really understand the impact that “Soul Train” had on society. I only knew that it was having an impact on me and what I thought was cool entertainment.

As a historian, I have a deeper understanding of the times I grew up in and Don Cornelius’ role during that time. He brought the soul genre to a wider audience and introduced many Americans to a vibrant African-American culture. He provided a stage for young African-Americans to express their talents and beauty. There was more to people than what white America portrayed and/or believed. Some say that “Soul Train” was simply a black version of “American Bandstand”. True, there were similarities in show design and cultural impact. But, in my opinion, “Soul Train” was a lot more fun.

In coming days, there will be many tributes to Don Cornelius, and this post will pale in comparison. There are several playlists on my iPod with titles that only I understand. When I put together a soul playlist, there was only one thing to call it – “Soul Train”. As a small tribute, these are a few of the artists and songs included on that list. If I could organize an intergalactic concert in Cornelius’ honor, then this is the lineup of performers that I would choose.

The Love Unlimited Orchestra – “Love’s Theme”

The Temptations – “Papa Was a Rollin’ Stone”

Curtis Mayfield – “Freddie’s Dead”

Marvin Gaye – “Let’s Get it On”

Barry White – “I’ve Got So Much to Give”

Edwin Starr – “War”

The Five Stairsteps – “O-O-H Child”

Stevie Wonder – “Superstition”

Billy Paul – “Me and Mrs. Jones”

Kool and the Gang – “Summer Madness”

Isaac Hayes – “Soulsville”

Roberta Flack – “The First Time I Ever Saw Your Face”

James Brown – “Down and Out in New York City”

The Isley Brothers – “That Lady”

The Commodores – “Brick House”

Bobby Womack – “Across 110th Street”

Sly and the Family Stone – “Everyday People”

Hues Corporation – “I’m Gonna Catch You”

Aretha Franklin – “Chain of Fools”

Chic – “Good Times”

The Staple Singers – “I’ll Take You There”

War – “All Day Music”

Bill Withers – “Ain’t No Sunshine”

The Brothers Johnson – “Strawberry Letter 23”

Gladys Knight and the Pips – “Midnight Train to Georgia”

Jackson 5 – “I Want You Back”

Lakeside – “Fantastic Voyage”

G.C. Cameron – “It’s So Hard to Say Goodbye to Yesterday”

Of course, Don Cornelius would come out at the end and sign off with his signature line, “I’m Don Cornelius, and as always in parting, we wish you love, peace and soul.”