Tag Archives: The Byrds

Dylan, Cash and the Nashville Cats

4 Mar

A few week ago, my wife and I visited the Country Music Hall of Fame, which we like to do when they have an interesting exhibit. This time, they had a couple of exhibits that I wanted to see. The first was about Sam Phillips and Sun Records. The second was about the friendship between Bob Dylan and Johnny Cash and the effect it had on the Nashville music scene.image-7

Nashville has always been known for Country music, but I have been more fascinated with the story of Nashville’s other music. For example, it has a deep Rhythm and Blues history and is where Jimi Hendrix got his start.

I have read about Dylan’s time in Nashville and was interested to see how the Country Music Hall of Fame would present it. They did better than I could have imagined and introduced me to facts that I did not know.

Obviously, Bob Dylan and Johnny Cash were the focus, but that was only the beginning. It covered the artists who were inspired by Dylan’s work in the city and followed him here. It was awesome to see the display on Paul McCartney and his time living in my hometown of Lebanon.image-9

The story of Paul McCartney’s time in town has gone down in local lore, but there were a ton of artists that I never knew recorded here. On the way out, I bought an album of songs that were highlighted in the exhibit, and it provides an example of some of those artists.

Gordon Lightfoot

The Byrds

The Monkees

Leonard Cohen

Country Joe McDonald

Simon and Garfunkel

George Harrison

Ringo Starr

Joan Baez

Neil Young

Derek and the Dominos

Those people are well-known in the history of music. However, this exhibit also highlighted the session musicians who played the music to which those people sang. These are the unsung heroes of Nashville and have become known as the Nashville Cats.

Several people had their own displays, but Jerry Reed was my favorite. Those who only know him as Snowman in Smokey and the Bandit or the football coach in The Waterboy may not realize that he was one of the greatest guitarists to ever play in Nashville. He was the heir apparent to Chet Atkins and had a distinctive style that other players have tried to duplicate.image-8

As always, the Country Music Hall of Fame did a fantastic job with the exhibit. Each time I go to the museum, I learn something new. If you ever make it to Nashville, then you will need to visit the place. Just remember that Country music is not the only music that has come out of this city.

When Listening to Sports Talk Radio Leads to an Investigation of Woodstock

13 Oct

The other day, I was listening to a sports talk radio interview with John Fogerty. Apparently, he has a book coming out that needs to be promoted. He spoke on a lot of interesting subjects, but my ears perked up with he was asked about Woodstock. In short, he did not have a good opinion of the event.CCR

Fogerty said that Creedence Clearwater Revival went on three hours late for two reasons. The Grateful Dead would not stop playing, and the festival was run by people who had no concept of time.  By the time Fogerty and the gang hit the stage, most of the crowd was passed out. Although, there was one guy in the distance who was holding up his lighter.

I looked up the Woodstock schedule and found the truth behind Fogerty’s words. He did not take the stage until well after midnight. However, I also found out something else. Performers who epitomized the era were not at the concert that epitomized the era.

Bob Dylan lived in the area but was not on the bill. In fact, he got upset at the number of people who had shown up.

The Doors turned down an invitation because they thought it was a knockoff of the Monterey Festival.

The Byrds did not play because it was one of many festivals taking place.

Joni Mitchell missed Woodstock to be on The Dick Cavett Show.

Woodstock is in the history books and is considered a watershed moment for the 1960s counterculture. However, it was a business venture. The organizers wanted to make money, and the performers wanted to make money. Many of the people who sang the soundtrack of the 1960s missed Woodstock because they would not get enough pay.

Woodstock was a huge event but was it bigger than Monterey? Was it a better concert than the Atlanta International Pop Festival?

Part of me thinks the fascination with Woodstock comes from the documentary released in 1970. It won an Academy Award; paid off the debts of the organizers; and preserved the festival for posterity. On film, Woodstock looks like fun, but I wonder if it was that fun in real life.

Did you attend Woodstock? Was it as important as history says it was? More importantly, how was the show?

Down in Monterey

9 Jun

We spent our honeymoon in northern California, and part of that experience consisted of a ride down the Pacific Coast highway from Half Moon Bay to Carmel. On this drive, we went through Monterey, and I could only think of one thing.

I wish I could have attended the Monterey Pop Festival, one of the great music festivals of the 1960s. Music festivals have become popular. In fact, Bonnaroo takes places just down the road from here. However, current festivals cannot be as good as the originals.

Earlier, “Monterey” by The Animals popped up on my iPod, and I realized something. I was not able to attend Monterey because I was not alive, but I can always write a blog post about it.

How will I write about something that I did not attend? Easy. I will provide the lyrics to the song and put pictures to it.

The people came and listened
Some of them came and played
Others gave flowers away
Yes they did
Down in Monterey
Down in Monterey

Young gods smiled upon the crowd
Their music being born of love
Children danced night and day
Religion was being born
Down in Monterey

The ByrdsByrds

and the AirplaneJefferson
Did fly
Oh, Ravi Shankar’sRavi
Music made me cry

The Who explodedWho
Into violent light
Hugh Masekela’s musicHugh
Was black as night

The Grateful DeadDead
Blew everybody’s mind
Jimi Hendrix, babyHendrix
Believe me
Set the world on fire, yeah!

His majesty
Prince Jones smiled as heJones
Moved among the crowd
Ten thousand electric guitars
Were groovin’ real loud, yeah

If you wanna find the truth in life
Don’t pass music by
And you know
I would not lie
No, I would not lie
No, I would not lie
Down in Monterey

Three days of understanding
Of moving with one another
Even the cops grooved with us
Do you believe me?
Yeah!

Down in Monterey
Down in Monterey, yeah
Down in Monterey
Down in Monterey, yeah

I think that maybe I’m dreamin’!

Monterey!

Monterey-yeah!

Down in Monterey

Did you hear what I said?

Down in Monterey

That some music

Monterey

I said
Monterey, Monterey, Monterey
Yeah-yeah, hey-hey-hey
A-ay, a-ay, a-ay-a-ay

My iPod Has Issues – Spring Break Has Come and Gone

16 Mar

Spring Break is over. School starts back, and I have to get my mind right to talk about history. That means getting into my office and spending some quiet time looking over notes. Of course, I have to arrive extra early to ask a couple of my cohorts about their Spring Break trip to Haiti.Spring Break

Getting my mind right also means listening to some tunes. With that in mind, I am going to turn on the iPod and see what kind of “Get My Mind Ready” music it can conjure up.

I think I will cheat and pick the first one.

“School’s Out” by Alice Cooper

“Mr. Tambourine Man” by The Byrds

“Up On The Roof” by The Drifters

“Good Golly Miss Molly” by Little Richard

“99 Problems” by Jay-Z

“Blue Skies” by The Allman Brothers Band

“You’re Nobody ‘Til Somebody Loves You” by Dean Martin

“Angel Eyes” by Scott Hamilton

“Immune” by Godsmack

“Spirit In The Sky” by Norman Greenbaum

“Sonny Got Caught In The Moonlight” by Robbie Robertson

“The Beat” by Lou Johnson

“Gimme Back My Bullets” by Lynyrd Skynyrd

“A Country Boy Can Survive” by Hank Williams, Jr.

“Sympathy For The Devil” by The Rolling Stones

“Rocky Mountain High” by John Denver

“Bring It On Home To Me” by Sam Cooke

“Big Iron” by Marty Robbins

“Buck’s Boogie” by Matt “Guitar” Murphy

“The Pilgrim: Chapter 33” by Kris Kristofferson

Tomorrow, I will get up bright and early and teach class to a bunch of students who have gotten up just as early. I should enter the room to Elvis’s intro music. I bet that would get their attention.

My iPod Has Issues – “Talking About Prostitutes is Tiresome” Edition

20 Feb

I cannot think of a single thing to write about. My mind has not been this big of a blank in a long time. Maybe it is frazzled. I have been giving my fabled “Prostitution in the American West” lecture this week, and the effort has drained me. I am also hungry. That could be a big part of it. On second thought, I think it is the prostitutes.Prostitute

Let us go ahead study the craziness that is my iPod.

“Rollin’ Stone” by Muddy Waters

“Mr. Tambourine Man” by The Byrds

“In Bloom” by Nirvana

“Bring Your Love to Me” by Hubert Sumlin

“That Lady” by The Isley Brothers

“Train, Train” by Blackfoot

“OK, So What?” by Freddie North

“Nice ‘n Easy” by Frank Sinatra

“Satan is Her Name” by Steve King

“The Look of Love” by Isaac Hayes

“If Anyone Falls” by Stevie Nicks

“Your Love is Amazing” by Robert Ward

“Back Home Again” by John Denver

“America” by Neil Diamond

“Don’t Forget That You’re My Baby” by The Spidells

“Truck Drivin’ Queen” by Moore and Napier

“With a Little Help From My Friends” by The Beatles

“Got Me Under Pressure” by ZZ Top

“(White Man) In Hammersmith Palais” by The Clash

“How Long” by Ace

Now, I am off to get some food and get some sleep.

My iPod Has Issues – Part 4

3 Mar

Once again, it is time to explore the dark recesses of my iPod’s mind. Some people think it’s bipolar. Some people think it’s schizophrenic. Others think it belongs alongside Jack Nicholson in One Flew Over a Cuckoo’s Nest.

That's my iPod on the left.

That’s my iPod on the left.

No matter the diagnosis, almost everyone agrees that my iPod is all over the place.

Sometimes it’s 1950s Rock & Roll. Other times it’s 1970s Punk. In between, it could be everything from Roy Acuff to Warren Zevon. Whatever it is, it plays my kind of music. Like previous therapy sessions, I am putting it on Shuffle and seeing what pops out.

“The Good, the Bad and the Ugly” by Ennio¬†Morricone

“Superfly Meets Shaft” by Dickie Goodman

“You Took the Words Right Out of My Mouth” by Meatloaf

“Mr. Tambourine Man” by The Byrds

“Tuff Enuff” by The Fabulous Thunderbirds

“I Started a Joke” by The Bee Gees

“Pretty Maids All in a Row” by The Eagles

“I Gotta Get Drunk” by Willie Nelson

“Right on Time” by Jimmy Church

“Strawberry Letter 23” by The Brothers Johnson

“TV Mama” by Big Joe Turner

“Passing Zone Blues” by Coleman Wilson

“Positively 4th Street” by Bob Dylan

“Skip’s Boogie” by Kid King’s Combo

“Buzzard Pie” by Rudy Green and His Orchestra

“Lady in the Street” by Stacy Mitchhart

“Viva Las Vegas” by Elvis Presley

“Sweet Jane” by The Velvet Underground

“One” by Three Dog Night

“Pearls Girl” by Underworld

That’s it. The therapy session is over. I hope my iPod came out of it with a high sense of self-esteem.