Tag Archives: Sam Cooke

My iPod Has Issues – It Has Been a Busy Day

11 Oct

It has been a busy day. It all started with a Historic Lebanon meeting at 7:30. Then, I went to work and prepared for my 9:30 class. After a quick lunch, it was time for my 12:30 class. At that point, I spent time at the copy machine making tests. That involves pushing more buttons than they push in a NASA control room.

I left campus and went to the bank. There were deposits to make. Then, it was to a meeting about city council issues. When that meeting was over, I drove to a meeting of the James E. Ward Agriculture and Community Center Management Committee. Yep, that is a along name. A lot of government committees have long names.

At that point, I went back to campus to finish making copies of tests. Of course, that involved pushing a bunch of buttons. On a mission to find copy paper, I ran into a couple of the other history professors and talked to them for a bit.

After all of that, I made it home to have a dinner of cold pizza. To wind down, I decided to have a little bourbon and see what is going on inside the mind of my iPod.

“Chain of Fools” by Aretha Franklin

“Keep A Knockin'” by Little Richard

“Changes” by David Bowie

“You Could Be Mine” by Guns N’ Roses

“Sleeping Bag” by ZZ Top

“Standing in the Safety Zone” by The Fairfield Four

“Tombstone Blues” by Bob Dylan

“Lady Marmalade” by Labelle

“I Just Can’t Help Believing” by B.J. Thomas

“No Better for You” by Gay Crosse and the Good Humor Six

“Bye Bye Love” by The Everly Brothers

“Westbound and Down” by Jerry Reed

“Honey” by Bobby Goldsboro

“Next to Me” by Clyde McPhatter

“We Will Rock You” by Queen

“Bring It On Home to Me” by Sam Cooke

“Help Me” by Joni Mitchell

“Ain’t That a Shame” by Fats Domino

“Baby Please Don’t Go” by Van Morrison

“I Got You Babe” by Sonny and Cher

 

 

My iPod Has Issues – Spring Break Has Come and Gone

16 Mar

Spring Break is over. School starts back, and I have to get my mind right to talk about history. That means getting into my office and spending some quiet time looking over notes. Of course, I have to arrive extra early to ask a couple of my cohorts about their Spring Break trip to Haiti.Spring Break

Getting my mind right also means listening to some tunes. With that in mind, I am going to turn on the iPod and see what kind of “Get My Mind Ready” music it can conjure up.

I think I will cheat and pick the first one.

“School’s Out” by Alice Cooper

“Mr. Tambourine Man” by The Byrds

“Up On The Roof” by The Drifters

“Good Golly Miss Molly” by Little Richard

“99 Problems” by Jay-Z

“Blue Skies” by The Allman Brothers Band

“You’re Nobody ‘Til Somebody Loves You” by Dean Martin

“Angel Eyes” by Scott Hamilton

“Immune” by Godsmack

“Spirit In The Sky” by Norman Greenbaum

“Sonny Got Caught In The Moonlight” by Robbie Robertson

“The Beat” by Lou Johnson

“Gimme Back My Bullets” by Lynyrd Skynyrd

“A Country Boy Can Survive” by Hank Williams, Jr.

“Sympathy For The Devil” by The Rolling Stones

“Rocky Mountain High” by John Denver

“Bring It On Home To Me” by Sam Cooke

“Big Iron” by Marty Robbins

“Buck’s Boogie” by Matt “Guitar” Murphy

“The Pilgrim: Chapter 33” by Kris Kristofferson

Tomorrow, I will get up bright and early and teach class to a bunch of students who have gotten up just as early. I should enter the room to Elvis’s intro music. I bet that would get their attention.

My iPod Has Issues – I’ve Seen Fire, and I’ve Seen Television

3 Feb

I am sitting by the fire and watching Top Gear. This show always brings out my inner race car driver. My wife is on the couch wondering why we are watching Top Gear. Apparently, it does not bring out her inner race car driver.

Earlier, we watched Bluegrass Underground. A few counties over someone has turned a cave into a concert hall, and some of the concerts are put on television. Tonight’s episode introduced us to a group called Davina and the Vagabonds. I thought they were pretty cool.Davina

The episode also brought out our inner musicians. Both of us wished we were outer musicians instead.

Before all of that, I put on my headphones, listened to the iPod and made out a test. In honor of Top Gear, Bluegrass Underground, my inner race car driver and our inner musicians, here are a few selections from the iPod that I had plugged into my headphones.

“Time of the Season” by The Zombies

“Without You” by Harry Nilsson

“Ballad of Davy Crockett” by Fess Parker

“I’m Gonna Catch You” by Hues Corporation

“De Guello” by Nelson Riddle

“Blue Suede Shoes” by Carl Perkins

“Try A Little Tenderness” by Otis Redding

“When A Guitar Plays The Blues” by Roy Buchanan

“If Anyone Falls” by Stevie Nicks

“A Change Is Gonna Come” by Sam Cooke

“Earth Angel” by The Penguins

“Electric Worry” by Clutch

“That’s My Man” by Marion James

“Sunshine” by Jonathan Edwards

“Hurdy Gurdy Man” by Donovan

“31 E. Blues” by Billie McAllister

“My Elusive Dreams” by David Houston and Tammy Wynette

“What A Difference A Day Makes” by Dinah Washington

“Clocks” by Coldplay

“I Want To” by Joe Tex

Now, I return to the regularly scheduled program.

My iPod Has Issues – WordPress Has Joined the Crazy Club

9 Dec

This morning, I logged into WordPress and found that the format has been changed. Obviously, this is not the first time that changes have taken place, and each time I have to learn how to navigate the system to get where I want.

It an old-fashioned question, but why fix something that is not broken? Ever heard of New Coke?New Coke

Hold on. Scratch that. The classic system I signed up on was not broken. The changes since that time have gradually made the platform worse. With each change, I have figured out how to get back to the classic. One of these days, the classic dashboard is going to be deleted, and the blogging world will stop spinning.

Anyway, the folks at WordPress either need busy work to justify their continued employment, or they have joined the crazy club. My iPod is the only thing crazier than these constant changes. With that in mind, we will go completely off the wall and use this crazy blogging platform to explore my crazy iPod.

Hold on to your minds!

“The Reflex” by Duran Duran

“La Grange” by ZZ Top

“Highway 61 Revisited” by Bob Dylan

“Mack the Knife” by Bobby Darin

“Raindrops Keep Falling On My Head” by Dionne Warwick

“Baby Love” by The Supremes

“Rikki Don’t Lose That Number” by Steely Dan

“The Devil Made Me Do It” by Golden Earring

“In The Garden” by John Prine and Mac Wiseman

“Say You Really Care” by Roscoe Shelton

“Cool” by Lou Busch and His Orchestra

“Big Long Slidin’ Thing” by Dinah Washington

“Bad Businessman” by Squirrel Nut Zippers

“Funk #49” by James Gang

“Coelocanth” by Shriekback

“Luckenbach, Texas” by Waylon Jennings

“Bring It On Home To Me” by Sam Cooke

“Banditos” by The Refreshments

“Hallelujah” by Sweathog

“Escape of Jennie Wiley” by Hylo Brown

“Smoke On The Water” by Deep Purple

“Roane County Prison” by Bill Monroe

“Beau Geste” by Hadley J. Castille

“Everlasting Love” by Robert Knight

“Stagger Lee” by Lloyd Price

Our brief musical interlude is over. Now, WordPress. Fix yourself.

My iPod Has Issues – Like For Real This Time

23 Apr

Some of you know about this series of posts. I write for a while about how messed up and confused state in which my iPod stays. It is filled with such an array of music that is gets confused and does not know exactly who it is. In short, it has an identity crisis.

Now, my iPod has some really serious issues. When my old laptop fell to the Blue Screen of Death, my files were trapped inside.Blue Screen

Luckily, the computer guy saved those files and brought them over to the Mac. Tests. Syllabi. Papers. Speeches. They are all here. He was also able to retrieve the music files I had uploaded from CD’s. Unfortunately, the computer guy was not able to get them back into iTunes.

You know about iTunes. They like to protect what you have purchased but have no use for what you bought in a real record store and put on the computer yourself.

Anyway, my music library is lacking. That means my iPod is in limbo. It still has the songs that were there before, but I cannot add any cool new stuff. You know, like the Jeremiah Johnson soundtrack that I bragged about the other day. Hopefully, my nephew can fix it when he comes back from college in a couple of weeks.

Until then, I will keep my iPod busy with a list of twenty random songs that can be found in its brain.

“Ain’t No Sunshine” by Bill Withers

“Rovin’ Gambler” by Mac Wiseman (who was just today inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame)

“Dark Night” by The Blasters

“Everybody Wants to Rule the World” by Tears for Fears

“Moody Blue” by Elvis Presley

“On Her Majesty’s Secret Service” by Propellerheads

“Arriving in Deadwood” by Michael Brook

“Don’t Bring Me Down” by The Animals

“Both Sides Now” by Joni Mitchell

“I Don’t Wanna Go On With You Like That” by Elton John

“500 Nations” by Peter Buffet

“You Send Me” by Sam Cooke

“Brown Eyes Girl” by Van Morrison

“Wanted Dead or Alive” by Bon Jovi

“Love, Love, Love” by Ted Jarrett

“He Stopped Loving Her Today” by George Jones

“Quiet Dog” by Mos Def

“Missing You” by John Waite

“Honky Tonk Women” by The Rolling Stones

“Oh Yeah” by Yello

Now, let us hurry up and get this music situation fixed.

 

 

I Went Down to the Crossroad

15 Mar

I just returned from an excursion to Tunica, Mississippi with my parents. I gambled and lost. I ate a lot of food. I did not find any prostitutes. However, the highlight of the trip was a drive south on Highway 61 to Clarksdale, Mississippi, a town that I have been wanting to visit for a long time.

I only knew a couple of things about Clarksdale. It is one of the places that claims to be home to the crossroad where Robert Johnson sold his soul to the Devil in return for being a great Blues guitarist. The junction of Highway 61 and Highway 49 is marked by a sign commemorating the spot.Clarksdale 5

As I got out to take a picture, I wondered if this was the real crossroad. Then, I wondered why I was wondering about a place that claims to be the location of an event that is more myth than fact.

No matter what happened at what crossroad, Clarksdale has built itself as the center of the Blues universe because of that legend. It hosts music festivals and is home to our next destination, the Delta Blues Museum.Clarksdale 1

This is a cool museum with all kinds of interesting artifacts. It is also where I learned that there is more to the town’s legacy than a legend at a highway crossing. It is the birthplace of Sam Cooke, John Lee Hooker and Ike Turner, who is famous for being the abusive husband of Tina Turner. Before that, he was known as the piano player on “Rocket 88“, which is considered by many to be the first Rock n’ Roll recording.

People who lived in Clarksdale include the aforementioned Robert Johnson, Muddy Waters and W.C. Handy.

At the museum, I picked up a town map that marked all of the historic locations. That is when I found out that a couple of other famous people lived in Clarksdale.

Charlie Conerly, a hometown hero, was quarterback for the New York Giants throughout the 1950s. However, the biggest surprise was discovering that Tennessee Williams lived there as a child when his grandfather was assigned to a local parish.

The town is not that large, and it did not take long to find the historic markers. We started with the marker for W.C. Handy, known as “Father of the Blues.” The museum claims that is more to good marketing than actual influence.Clarksdale 2

Next, we drove across downtown to the Tennessee Williams Park, which sits around the corner from his grandfather’s church.Clarksdale 3

This is where I learned that Williams got some of his characters from people he knew in Clarksdale. Down the street sits the Cutrer Mansion, the home of Blanche Cutrer and her husband. It seems to me that there is a character in one of his plays named Blanche.

After taking a drive past the palatial homes in this neighborhood, we went back across town to the other thing I knew about Clarksdale. It is home to Ground Zero Blues Club, owned by Morgan Freeman.Clarksdale 4

Here are my parents in front of the Ground Zero sign.Clarksdale 6

The club served lunch during the day, but we were disappointed. It was not that great. However, the waitress did a good job. My mom asked a lot of questions about Morgan Freeman, and I am sure that they were questions that the waitress has heard many times. He lives in Mississippi when he is not filming and comes by quite often. In fact, he has an apartment upstairs. He is humble but, as the waitress described, “smells like money.” I reckon that was her way of saying that he tries to hide his success, but everyone knows he is rich and famous.

We finished our meal and drove past the famous crossroad on our way out of town. However, that is when I started thinking about the place we had just seen and how it may have looked back in the old days. I started by wondering how the crossroad looked back then. If Robert Johnson made his way to this place, then was it a dirt crossing in the middle of cotton fields like I have always imagined? Or, was it a group of shacks on the outskirts of town where people lived and survived?

Whatever it looked like, I imagine that it was completely different from the neighborhood Tennessee Williams and Blanche Cutrer lived in. That was the home of the landed gentry who owned the cotton fields surrounding the town and the businesses within the town.

Clarksdale’s downtown, which can be walked across easily, is an interesting place. Although the buildings are now old and worn, they are signs that Clarksdale was once a thriving place. The buildings are multi-storied and must have been grand in their day. There are facades of banks and other lucrative businesses. There is no doubt that this was once a place of money.

However, that money flowed to one side of town. The other side of town, literally the other side of the tracks, was where those who left the fields of sharecropping to make their way, congregated and lived. This is where the Blues could be heard, and small African-American owned businesses could be found.

The two sides of town were within walking distance but were worlds apart. Downtown must have been the intersection. I could see people like Brick, Maggie the Cat and Big Daddy walking the streets and talking about “those people” when they saw them across the street. In the real world, “those people” were Sam Cooke, Muddy Waters, John Lee Hooker and Robert Johnson.

I wonder what the landed gentry would think about the modern version of their town. While their houses remain, they are not why people travel to Clarksdale. People come to Clarksdale because of the music that was made on the other side of the tracks. People come to Clarksdale because of the music that was inspired by the conditions that people on the other side of the tracks found themselves in. People come to Clarksdale to celebrate their accomplishments and not the accomplishments of the ones who thought they would be remembered.

By the way, the richest man in town is an African-American who “smells like money.”

As we drove out of town, I wondered what the landed gentry would think about that.

My iPod Has Issues – Part 8

10 Sep

My iPod is on the couch and ready to bare its soul. It wants to know why it drives people crazy. It wants to know why people think it’s weird. It wants to know if it truly has a split personality. The only way to do that is to let the psychiatrist delve into the deep recesses of its mind.Psychiatrist

It’s a surprisingly simple procedure – just hit shuffle and see what comes out.

“A Good-Hearted Woman” by Waylon Jennings

“California Dreamin'” by The Mamas and the Papas

“Old Friend” by Lyle Lovett

“A Change is Gonna Come” by Sam Cooke

“Baker Street” by Jerry Rafferty

“Ticket to Ride” by The Beatles

“Oh! Look at Me Now” by Frank Sinatra

“Thank You (Falettinme Be Mice Elf Agin)” by Sly and the Family Stone

“Pretty Maids All in a Row” by The Eagles

“Still of the Night” by Whitesnake

“Walk This Way” by Run-DMC

“Rocket 88” by Jackie Brenston and His Delta Cats

“Deeper Water” by Paul Kelly

“Me and Mrs. Jones” by Billy Paul

“Blue Eyes Cryin’ in the Rain” by Willie Nelson

“The Dirty Boogie” by The Brian Setzer Orchestra

“Gitarzan” by Ray Stevens

“Your Love is Amazing” by Robert Ward

“Jim Dandy” by LaVern Baker

“The Road” by Nick Cave and Warren Ellis

Did we learn anything?